Iaeaoecdnea Uranium Red Book

The IAEA collaborates with OECD-NEA in the collection, analysis and publication of worldwide data on uranium resources, production and demand popularly known as Uranium Red Book. The IAEA is the only global authoritative forum to provide independent and reliable analysis and information on the status of world uranium production and the projections of uranium requirements in Member States with nuclear power programme. The Red Book is published biannually and reports status of worldwide uranium industry based on governmental report and statistics. The information in the Red Book is extensively used by Member States with uranium production and/or nuclear power for the planning and policy making. The data for the Red Book are submitted by Member States through the Red Book questionnaire. The publication of the Red Book is in the year following Red Book date. For example, the Red Book 2005 will be published in the Spring of 2006. The Red Book 2003 containing data from 43 countries has been published in 2004 [1]. The Red Book 2005 is under preparation and would be finalized in the IAEA/OECD-NEA Uranium Group meeting in November 2005. For the first time, the data is being submitted electronically with an idea of having Red Book online hereafter. So far, some 41 countries have responded to the IAEA questionnaire. The following changes have been made in the resource category of the Red Book 2005 :

• The Estimated Additional Resource-I (EAR-I) would be hereafter referred as "Inferred Resources"

• The EAR-II has been replaced by Prognosticated Resources

• The Reasonably Assured Resources (RAR) plus Inferred Resources are now referred to as Identify Resources.

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World Distribution of Uranium Deposits

Deposits Statistics Country Report Help sei' Mehmet Ceyhai

Initial Resources of Uranium Deposits • ■»

Deposits Statistics Country Report Help sei' Mehmet Ceyhai

Initial Resources of Uranium Deposits • ■»

Select Su

mmary Table!

O Deposit Num and Type

>ers by Cou

ntry

® Initial Resources by Country anc Type (*)(**)

O Deposit Numbers by Reg and Type

o

n O Initial Resources by Region and Type (*) (**)

Deposit Type

©

Deposit Status ©

Region

Country

( All

1 All

¡al

1 The World

1 All

Name contains

1

1

Go 1

Reset All Filters

Country

Un confor

mity

SandStone

Hematit Breccia Complex

Quartz-pebble Congl.

Volcanic

Intrusive

Vein

Metasomatic

Other

Total

Algeria

0

1,500

0

0

0

0

19,400

0

0

20,900

Argentina

0

16,790

0

0

0

0

1,720

0

1,285

19,795

Australi a

365

579

100,878

1,335,940

0

9,313

5,129

2,544

18,725

74,160

1,912,270

Bolivia

0

500

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

500

Brazil

0

7,000

0

0

22,700

0

0

160,700

0

190,400

Bulgaria

0

38,300

0

0

4,780

0

12,980

0

1,500

57,560

Cameroon

0

5,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5,000

Canada

458

250

4,040

0

232,300

9,590

7,500

39,650

0

0

751,330

Central Republic

O

0

O

0

0

0

0

16,700

16,700

Chile

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

China

0

10,500

0

0

20,000

0

11,000

0

26,000

67.500

Congo

0

0

0

0

0

0

29,500

0

0

29,500

Czech Republic

0

140,000

0

0

0

0

90,000

0

2,500

232,500

FIG. 3. Representative screen from new UDEPO web site. IAEA Database on World Distribution of Uranium Deposits (UDEPO)

The UDEPO is a computerized, online technical and geological database on uranium deposits worldwide. It includes deposits with 500 tonnes or more uranium and with an average grade of 0.03%U308 and above. The uranium deposits are classified according to the Red Book terminology. Presently, UDEPO has the records of more than 800 deposits from some 50 countries. All types of deposits, namely, unconformity, sandstone, hematit breccia complex, quartz pebble conglomerate, volcanic, intrusive, vein, metasomatic, etc., are included. The database is being continuously updated and expanded and has been publicly made available since 2004. The web site would provide maps with location of deposits. Figure 3 shows a representative screen from the new UDEPO web site.

IAEA Database on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (INFCIS)

INFCIS is an online database on civilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities worldwide. The web site is: http://www-nfcis.iaea.org. It covers commercial as well as pilot laboratory scale facilities. INFCIS is updated annually through questionnaires to nominated contact points in Member States. In addition, other authoritative information sources (e.g. publications in journals, symposium proceedings, etc) are also used when official data is not available. A typical screen from new INFCIS web site showing commercial nuclear fuel cycle facilities worldwide is described in Fig. 4.

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Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System

Facilities Statistics Country Reports Help

User Mehmet Ceyhan

Numbers of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities

Select Summary Table!

© Facility Numbers by o Facility Capacities by Type and Status (*) (**)

O Facility Numbers by Country and Status o Facility Capacities by Country and Status (*) (**)

O Facility Numbers by Country and Type

Facility Status

Country

Select Summary Table!

© Facility Numbers by o Facility Capacities by Type and Status (*) (**)

O Facility Numbers by Country and Status o Facility Capacities by Country and Status (*) (**)

O Facility Numbers by Country and Type

Facility Status

Country

am

All

I 1 Commercial ^

| The Wo

rid

All

-1

Mame contains:

Go

ZD

1

Reset All Filters

Type

Operation

Construction

Awaiting License

Planned

Shutdown

D e c o m m.

StandBy

Other

Total

Uranium ore processing

32

3

0

0

38

61

15

15

164

U recovery from p h o s p h ate s

0

0

0

0

0

2

6

4

12

Conversion

26

0

1

2

5

7

1

0

42

Uranium enrichment

13

2

0

1

1

3

1

1

22

Fuel fabrication - U

39

1

0

1

5

20

2

0

68

Fuel fabrication - MOX

3

0

1

2

2

4

0

1

13

AFR wet spent fuel storage

31

0

0

0

0

3

1

0

35

AFR dry spent fuel storage

40

6

6

15

0

0

0

1

68

Spent fuel reprocessing

6

1

0

1

1

13

1

3

26

Zirconium alloy

7

0

0

2

1

1

0

0

»

Zircaloy tubing

15

0

0

0

4

1

0

0

20

Heavy water production

7

0

0

0

1

5

2

2

-

Total

219

13

8

24

58

120

29

27

498

FIG. 4. Representative screen from new INFCIS web site. (showing commercial nuclear fuel cycle facilities worldwide - numbers and status)

Environmental Protection and Best Practices

Environmental issues in the front-end of the uranium production cycle including mining, milling, chemical purification and long-term management of mine tails, residual materials and radioactive wastes are of paramount importance to the uranium industry. The Agency provides guidance on best practices in the planning, operation and closure of uranium production facilities including mine reclamation, from the perspective of changing environmental regulations in mining facilities and growing environmental concerns in uranium mining. This is of great use to Member States which are developing uranium resources but do not have adequate regulatory and technological infrastructure. This will facilitate the Member States to take informed policy decisions and plan strategy associated with uranium production and to make use of preventive measures to reduce impacts from uranium mining and milling on the environment through guidance and transfer of information on current status and perspectives. In this connection, the Agency prepares state-of-the-art documents on the best practices in all types of uranium mining including open cast mining, deep underground mining, In-Situ Leaching (ISL) and purification operations involving solvent extraction and ion exchange processes for obtaining uranium concentrate (yellowcake) from uranium ores. Table II and III summarize the IAEA TECDOCs published during last five years and the ones that are under preparation respectively.

Table II. IAEA publications on uranium geology, exploration, mining, milling, environment protection in mines and mills since 2000 (already published: 13)

Year Reference

Title of the TECDOC

2000 IAEA-TECDOC-1174 Methods of exploitation of different types of uranium deposits

2001 STI/PUB/1104

IAEA-TECDOC-1239 IAE A-TECDOC-1244

IAEA-TECDOC-1258

2002 Working Material

C&S Papers Series 10/P

2003 IAEA-TECDOC-1296

IAEA-TECDOC-1363 2004 I AE A-TECDOC-1396

I AE A-TECDOC-1419

2005 IAEA-TECDOC-1425

IAEA-TECDOC-1428

Analysis of Uranium Supply to 2050

Manual of acid in situ leach uranium mining technology

Impact of new environmental and safety regulations on uranium exploration, mining, milling and management of its waste (Proceedings of a TCM held in Vienna, 14-17 Sept.98)

Assessment of uranium deposit types and resources - a worldwide perspective (Proceedings of a TCM organized by the IAEA and OECD/NEA, Vienna, June 1997)

In Situ Leach Uranium Mining, Proceedings of a Technical Committee Meeting held in Almaty, Kazakhstan, 9-12 Sept. 96

The Uranium Production Cycle and the Environment: Proceedings of the International Symposium held in Vienna, 2-6 October 2000

Technologies for the treatment of effluents from uranium mines, mills and tailings, Proceedings of a Technical Committee Meeting held in Vienna, 1-4 November 1999

Guidelines for radioelement mapping using gamma-ray spectrometry data

Recent Developments in Uranium Resources, Production and Demand with Emphasis on In Situ Leach Mining, Proceedings of a Technical Meeting held in Beijing, China, September 2002

Treatment of liquid effluent from uranium mines and mills (Report of a Coordinated Research Project)

Recent developments of uranium resources, production, demand and the environment, Proceedings of a technical meeting in Vienna, June 1999

Guidebook on environmental impact assessment for in situ leach (ISL) mining projects

Table III. IAEA publications on uranium geology, exploration, mining, milling, environment protection in mines and mills (under preparation/publication: 5)

Title of the TECDOC

• Recent Developments in uranium exploration, production and environmental issues (in press)

• Criteria for sustainable development of uranium mining & milling operations

• Radioelement mapping and status of the global radioelement baseline and maps

• Best practices in environmental management of uranium production facilities

• Natural background of uranium deposits including surface and Ground waters

Looking Forward

In recent years, there has been an expansion of nuclear power programme all over the world, and experts call it "A Nuclear Renaissance". This has led to an increasing demand of uranium and, in turn, a revival of the uranium industry after a long slump of two decades. During the last three years, the uranium spot price has increased nearly three times. The secondary supplies of uranium, which meet nearly 45% of market demand today, are likely to be progressively diminished particularly after 2020. It is heartening to know that new exploration and mining activities have been initiated, major uranium producers have increased their annual production and there has been significant expansion in In-Situ Leaching (ISL) activities. New mines and mills are required to be opened during the next two decades in order to close or narrow the gap between uranium in the ground and the yellowcake (uranium concentrate) in the can. The present Symposium has been organized at the most opportune time when the uranium industry is poised for a take-off. The response from the Member States have been overwhelming. The Symposium is being attended by nearly 200 participants from 30 countries and 4 international organizations, namely, OECD-NEA, NEI, WNA and UNECE as well as the IAEA. Some 100 technical papers have been received and compiled into the book of the extended synopsis. An exhibition on uranium exploration and mining and production has also been organized. The deliberations and discussions in the Symposium, in the panel and in the corridors will provide new guidances to the IAEA for planning their programme and budget activities in coming years.

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