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Data source: U.S. Census Bureau (http://www.census.gov).

Data source: U.S. Census Bureau (http://www.census.gov).

and other places with 2,500 or more inhabitants. Only limited data are provided for ZIP codes. Statistics for smaller areas are typically withheld to avoid disclosing information about individual firms. The level of geographic detail varies widely for major data items. Basic census content includes several key statistics such as the number of establishments (or companies), number of employees, payroll, and measures of output like sales revenue, which the economic census refers to as the value of shipments.

Because the economic census is now based on the NAICS, only limited information is published according to the old SIC system. However, a detailed "bridge table" showing the relationships between NAICS and SIC categories makes for an easier comparison between current and previous statistics. Although still very slow by private-sector standards, 2002 economic census results will become available on the Internet much faster than the results from prior censuses, which were largely distributed in printed form. Although only highlights of recent economic censuses are available in printed form, software on both CD-ROM and the Internet allows companies to print detailed data. Given a faster publication cycle, industry reports for manufacturing, mining, and construction, previously issued in both preliminary and final form, are now issued only once. In another recent change, all reports are now titled simply as economic census reports. They are no longer treated as if each sector had a separate census, e.g., the census of manufacturers.

Detailed data are issued, sector by sector, on CD-ROM and on the Internet. Geographic area series (published for all sectors) provide detail for establishments with employees, for the nation, states, and substate areas. ZIP code statistics are also published for most sectors. Industry series reports for manufacturing, mining, and construction provide national totals on groups of related industries and their products. Limited data are available for individual states. Subject series (all sectors) provide national and limited local data on special topics including merchandise line sales, concentration ratios, and both establishment and firm sizes. Summary reports by sector provide highlights of the data in print. They feature primarily national data and general statistics by state, and include illustrations of some of the more detailed data available in electronic media. Table 11.4 shows a typical example of the level of detail available in the geographic area series. This example shows the makeup of the broadcasting and telecommunications sector in the state of Colorado during 1997.

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