Y Habitat for Humanity9

The fourdi promise is ''Marketable Skills/' the idea that the goal of education is to allow children to move from the world of school to the world of work. They must be provided with a useful set of skills that employers want and need. 'Che fifth promise is "Opportunities to Serve," the idea that community service gives children a sense of responsibility for their own community and enhances their self-esteem and confidence.

America's Promise has created a diverse and growing Alliance of more than 400 nation-aI organizations called Partners. These Partners make large-scale national commitments Lo fulfill one or more of the I'ive Promises.

In Alabama, the effort is called "Alabama's Promise—I lie Alliance I'or Youth." I his is a statewide initiative dedicated to mobilizing communities, individuals, groups and organizations from Alabama. It's purpose is to build and strengthen the character and competence of Alabama's children.

Another opportunity for volunteering in Alabama which has been endorsed and aided by the Governor's Office, is Ameri-Corps, America's local-community answer Lo the Peace Corps. Yoimg people who volunteer with AmeriCorps get a small allowance and an education scholarship in exchange for one year of their time. Young people spend Lheir time in an intensive effort to help their communities.

Here are five things you can do to Kelp your community:

1. Stay in school and learn all you can.

1. Visit people who have no one to visit them, such as people who live alone.

3. Help a neighbor.

4. Think about what skills you have (such as computer skills), find an organization where they're needed, and volunteer to provide them.

5. Learn all you can about your community and your government, and get involved in the youth groups they provide.

AliiKama ] Isiiuihr«>k AL57

People in Alabama History

Many oi Alabama's citizens have con-tributed to the success of our nation in a variety of ways. Helen Keller, a famous ALabamian, overcame the humdiciips of blindness and deafness. She became an author and a well known advocate for the disabled, woman's rights, and social justice. Hank Aaron, born in Mobile, was the last player in the Negro League to also play in baseball's major leagues. He broke the major league record for home runs in a career. Tom BcvOl, born and raised in Townley, was a veteran of World War IL He became a United States Representative in 1%6. As the chairman of the linergy and Water Development Subcommittee, he was instrumental in helping the 'lennessee-'lombigbee waterway project.

Ihe Sel ma-to-Montgomery March was a famous event in Alabama that represented one of the high points, bodi in emotion and in political influence, of the modem civil rights movement On March 7, 1965, about 600 civil rights marchers headed east out of Sel ma, Alabama, on U.S. Route 80. When the marchers reached the lidmund I'ettus Bridge six blocks away, they were met by state and local lawmen. The lawmen attacked I he marchers with billy clubs ¿ind tear gas and drove them back into Selma. Since marchers were injured, the date became known as "Bloody Sunday."

I Wo days later on March 9, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. led another group of marchers in a "symbolic" march to I he bridge. Dr. King and other civil rights leaders then asked for court protection for a third march from Selma to the state capítol in Montgomery. Prank Johnson, Jr., tlie Federal District Court Judge at the time, ruled in favor of the marchers. In his opinion, he wrote, "'Che law is clear that the right to petition one's government for the redress of grievances may be exercised in large groups.,, and these rights may be exercised by marching, even along public highways."

On Sunday, March 21, about 3,200 marchers left for Montgomery,, walking '12 miles a day ¿md sleeping in fields. By the time the marchers reached the c¿ipitol on ¡¡ Thursday, March 25, they num-1 bered over 25,000. The march

T Selma March, featuring Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1965

ALABAMA HANDBOOK

▼ George Washington Carver in lab

Y Condoleezza Rice

received much attention nationwide. Less than three months later, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

George Washington Carver—teacher, lecturer, agriculture experimenter—was born on a Missouri farm. He moved to Tuskegee, Alabama, in '1896 to become an instructor at the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute. I During his lifetime, Carver developed 325 products from peanuts, 108 applications for sweet potatoes, and 75 products derived from pecans.

Born in 1886, Hugo Black became a U.S. Senator and later served for more than 30 years on the U.S. Supreme Court, having been appointed in 1937. As a justice, Black was a strong defender of free speech and other civil liberties. Throughout his term, which ended

▼ George Washington Carver in lab

< osniiziS1

with his retirement in 1971, Black prided himself on being a supporter of minorities in the United States. He supported the Supreme Court's decision in Brown v. Board of Education of Tapeka, Kansas, which ended the enforcement of racially segregated schools. A Hugo Black

In 2001, President George W. Bush named Condoleezza Rice the National Security Advisor for his administration. Rice was born in 1954, in Birmingham, Alabama. She studied political science and international relations in college and earned her Ph.D. in 1981. I ¡ol lowing her appointment to Bush's staff Rice later became a pivotal member of his team fighting the war against terrorism.

Y Condoleezza Rice

CONTENTS

Reference Atlas

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

United States: Political

World: Political

RA2 RA4

United States 2000 Congressional Reapportionment

ATLAS KEY

fe M

SYMBOL KEY

Canal

Claimed boundary Internatícnal boundary

4 Depression

Elevation © National capital • Towns

(ce cay

Oceans

Desert

Below sea level Dry salt lake Lake --- Rivers

Lava Sand Swamp

Kef^rbnce Atlas RAI

missiA

Ptnniwlx

Ki'iktwf

Kcxiirt t.

Honolulu

ARIZONA

Los Angeles'

fTAIVATf

Phocnia

RA2 Keferencte Atlas

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\ CRbh'N LAN i KA LA ALLJT NUNAATl

UNITED STATES

POLITICAL

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Billings

WYOMING

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WORLD

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Seattle

Olymptag

WASHINGTON

Portland Saleltt.«

north dakota

Helena»

SOUTH

DAKOTA

Sioux Falls*

Lincoln»

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Los Angolos

Oklahoma

City® OKLAHOMA

•Albtjquerque NHW MEXICO

San Diogo*

Phoenix;

Fort* Worth

RUSSIA

Au&ting

San Antonio

CANADA

State gaining 2 seats State gaining 1 seat No change State losing 1 seat State losing 2 seats Total number of seats

Corpus Christi,

Anchorage^

aIlaska

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MATNR

MINNESOTA

Montpclicnj.

WISCONSIN

Albany^ N^MASSf

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KENTUCKY

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NORTH CAROLINA

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TEN N CSSLD

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ARKANSAS

Atlanta

ALABAMA GEORGIA %

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Jackson oo McvtgomcryS

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UNITED STATES

2000 CONGRESSIONAL REAPPORTIONMENT

Talla h asa ce.

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Houston i;;V us

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f <} i t' I (! o i : ti Ts-PRINCIPAL HAWAIIAN ISLANDS

NATIONAL CEOGRAPHIC

H&w&ii

BEADING TO LEARN

Ever notice that words are everywhere? They're on food labels and gum wrappers, in movie credits and CD booklets, in mail and e-mail, in textbooks and comic books. This handbook focuses on skills and strategies that can help you understand the words you read. The strategies you use to understand whole texts depend on the kind of text you are reading. Using this handbook can help make you a better reader.

USE THIS HANDBOOK TO HELP YOU LEARN }

♦ how to identify new words and build your vocabulary

• how to adjust the way you read to fit your reason for reading

* how to use specific reading strategies to better under stand what you read

♦ how to use critical thinking strategies to think more deeply about what you read

You'll also team about

• text structures

♦ reading for research

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Identifying Words and

Building Vocabulary

____RH1

Reading for a Reason

.,..RH3

Understanding What You Read

----RH4

Thinking About Your Reading .

... .RH6

Understanding Text Structure .

____RH7

Reading for Research

.,. .RH9

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