Of the Chief Causes of the Decay of Trade in England and Fall of the Rents of Land

The Two Chief Causes of the Decay of Trade, are the many Prohibitions and high Interest. The Prohibition of Trade, is the Cause of its Decay for all Forreign Wares are brought in by the Exchange of the Native So that the Prohibiting of any Foreign Commodity, doth hinder the Making and Exportation of so much of the Native, as used to be Made and Exchanged for it. The Artificers and Merchants, that Dealt in such Goods, lose their Trades and the Profit that was gained by such Trades, and laid out...

Discourse of Coyned Money

In the former Discourse, it hath been already made appear, that Gold and Silver for their scarcity, have obtained in small quantities, to equal in value far greater quantities of other Metals, & c. And farther, from their easie Removal, and convenient Custody, have also obtained to be the common Measure in the World between Man and Man in their dealings, as well for Land, Houses, & c., as for Goods and other Necessaries. For the greater Improvement of this Convenience, and to remove some...

Discourse Concerning the Abatement of Interest

Arguments for Abatement of Interest are many, viz. I. When Interest is less, Trade is incourag'd, and the Merchant can be a Gainer whereas, when it is great, the Usurer, or Money-owner takes all. II. The Dutch, with whom Interest is low, Trade cheaper, and undersell us. III. Land falls in value, as Interest riseth. With divers others, whereof the Facts may be true, but proceed from another Cause, and conduce nothing to the purpose for which they are alledg'd. I shall not formally apply myself...